CPRE Knowledge Hub

The American Rescue Plan authorized $120 billion in education relief funding to help states and students recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, reserving a portion of the aid for evidence-based interventions targeting learning loss. Despite its long-standing presence in America’s educational lexicon, however, the term “evidence-based” is not as concrete or even widely understood as many may believe. Renowned researchers and policy experts Jonathan Supovitz (University of Pennsylvania) and Carrie Conaway (Harvard University) join CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss the evolution and impacts of evidence-based requirements in the U.S., and some recommendations for states, districts and other stakeholders planning for the immediate future, and beyond.
School absenteeism policies may be a key driver of racial disparities in students' juvenile court involvement, according to a new study. The study, coauthored by the University of Tennessee's Clea McNeely, examined absenteeism policies in nearly 100 districts across the U.S., finding that students of color may be significantly more likely to be declared truant than their white classmates. The study, supported the Spencer Foundation, also examined the relationship between truancy and juvenile court involvement in three districts, finding that absenteeism policies may play a significant role in disparate outcomes between white students and students of color. McNeely joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss those findings, and some important implications for policymakers, school leaders and other stakeholders across the country.
Over the last two decades, more than 150 schools in at least 20 states have adopted a “teacher-powered” model, offering educators greater autonomy and influence in areas including curriculum, budgeting and personnel. In a special episode, we look at the research behind teacher-powered schools, their potential impacts on teachers and student outcomes, and speak with a principal and former superintendent about what the model looks like in action. Guests include Richard Ingersoll, renowned education researcher and professor at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education; Sara Kemper, research associate with Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement at the University of Minnesota; Jeff Austin, principal of Social Justice Humanitas Academy in California; and Charles Kyte, former executive director of the Minnesota Association of School Administrators and a former school superintendent in Minnesota.
Widespread school closures last spring caused significant frustration and disruption for students and families. But were they worth it? A new study coauthored by Brown University's Emily Rauscher and Ailish Burns examines the relationship between school closure timing and COVID-19 impacts, finding that later closures were associated with higher numbers of cases and deaths in surrounding communities. Rauscher and Burns join CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss the study, and some key takeaways for policymakers, districts, school leaders and other stakeholders as schools begin to reopen across the country.
The COVID-19 pandemic caused widespread operational challenges and unprecedented disruption in America's early childhood education sector. But can it serve as a learning opportunity? A new policy brief from researchers and partners at the University of Michigan, the Harvard Graduate School Of Education, MDRC and Boston Public Schools highlights the impacts of COVID-19 on Boston's universal pre-K program, and shares some important lessons learned. Coauthors Christina Weiland (University of Michigan) and Annie Taylor (Boston Public Schools) join CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss the brief, and offer some research-backed recommendations for early childhood stakeholders across the U.S.
In the wake of the Great Depression, neighborhoods across the U.S. were assigned "mortgage security" grades, which lenders would use to provide or deny home loans to residents. Those grades, which disproportionately harmed communities of color, may still be impacting schools and students nearly a century later, according to a new working paper by Harvard University researchers Dylan Lukes and Christopher Cleveland. Lukes and Cleveland join CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss their research, which found that schools located in historically redlined neighborhoods have lower district-level per-pupil revenues, less diverse student populations, and worse average test scores than those in higher-graded neighborhoods. They also discuss some key takeaways for policymakers, districts, education researchers and other stakeholders across the U.S.
Many factors may lead teachers to leave the field. But why, under certain circumstances, are teachers of color more likely to leave the profession that their white colleagues? In a new study coauthored by George Mason University's Toya Jones Frank and Marvin Powell, a team of researchers surveyed hundreds of Black math educators across the U.S., gauging their perceptions, experiences and feelings about the profession. Frank and Powell join CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss their findings, and offer some valuable recommendations for districts, policymakers, schools and other stakeholders hoping to better retain and support Black educators.
Anxiety relating to COVID-19, teaching, and parental communication were among the most significant predictors of teacher stress and burnout this fall, according to new research by Christopher Newport University's Timothy Pressley. In one of the first studies of its kind, Pressley surveyed hundreds of teachers in 17 states to gauge their perceptions and anxiety levels in the wake of the pandemic. He joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss what he learned, and some implications for districts, school leaders, educators and other stakeholders as schools begin to reopen across the country.
From pre-K to high school to college, the COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on nearly all aspects of American education. One field of research, however, may offer some insight into its potential impacts on students. In a new article, University of Virginia researcher Chris Chang-Bacon draws on years of research into Students with Interrupted Formal Education, or SIFE, and offers lessons for educators working to support students following a year of disruption and disconnection. Chang-Bacon joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss his work and some evidence-backed recommendations for policymakers, school leaders, researchers and other stakeholders attempting to navigate a post-COVID world. He also discusses how supports used during the pandemic can be preserved for future generations of SIFE students.
Between 2013 and 2015, Colorado and Nevada enacted legislation mandating that qualifying schools implement a "breakfast after the bell" program for students. In a new study, researchers Jacob Kirksey (Texas Tech University) and Michael Gottfried (University of Pennsylvania) examined the impacts of those programs on student attendance, finding they led to a significant reduction in chronic absenteeism. Kirksey joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss those and other findings, and some potential national implications for districts and schools in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The crowdfunding platform DonorsChoose plays a surprisingly large role in American education, directing nearly $1 billion in donations to teachers at more than 80 percent of all U.S. public schools over the last two decades. A new study coauthored by the University of Oklahoma's Deven Carlson examined the schools and teachers that seek out and receive funding on the platform, finding that more than half of all submissions related to math and reading. Carlson joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss those and other findings, and some key takeaways for policymakers, school leaders and other stakeholders in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Effective teachers can be one of the most powerful drivers of student success. Yet, across the country, districts and schools often struggle to identify, retain and develop them. In a new working paper, American University researcher Seth Gershenson examines years of research into teacher effectiveness, identifying common challenges and promising approaches to teacher evaluation, pre-service training and in-service professional development. Gershenson, author of the new book "Teacher Diversity and Student Success," joins CPRE Knowledge Hub managing editor Keith Heumiller to discuss the paper, and its implications for educational equity, student achievement and the nation's teaching workforce.